Vascular Depression: Longitudinal Followup

Summary

Principal Investigator: Yvette Sheline
Abstract: DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): A significant body of research supports a role of vascular disease in the pathogenesis of late-life depression. It has been proposed that vascular disease affects white matter pathways and subcortical structures involved in mood regulation and is associated with poorer cognitive function and treatment resistance. While a number of cross-sectional observations have been described, it is not known how these abnormalities predict longitudinal course. Further, the interaction between white matter pathology and structural changes in important gray matter structures, including orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, hippocampus and basal ganglia is not fully studied. The proposed study will follow up a well defined cohort of late life depressed (LLD) subjects recruited for the NIH-funded "Treatment Outcome of Vascular Depression" study. In that study we have found an association between baseline cognitive and structural measures and acute response to antidepressants. In the current proposal we will extend those findings to determine their impact on longitudinal course of depression. The proposed study will examine the effect of baseline neuroimaging findings and cognitive function in predicting course of illness over a five year follow-up. We propose to conduct a collaborative study with 168 elderly subjects enrolled in the previous "Treatment Outcomes of Vascular Depression" study at Duke University and Washington University. They will receive follow-up magnetic resonance imaging, neuropsychological testing, and a careful interval history focusing on their depression history, antidepressant use, and medical history to test the hypotheses that: 1) LLD individuals with more depressive episodes over the 5 year longitudinal course will have greater baseline impairment on measures of a) white matter structure b) smaller volumes of the amygdala, hippocampus, and orbitofrontal cortex and c) neuropsychological function;2) LLD individuals with more depressive episodes over the 5 year longitudinal course will have greater changes on these MRI and neuropsychological test variables over the interim. In secondary aims we will test the effect of the interaction of the measures on depression duration, and examine the effects of connectivity in specific fiber tracts on depression course. The proposal will provide important new data on neuroradiologic and neuropsychological factors contributing to recurrent or chronic depression in older individuals.
Funding Period: ----------------2007 - ---------------2011-
more information: NIH RePORT

Top Publications

  1. pmc Treatment course with antidepressant therapy in late-life depression
    Yvette I Sheline
    Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA
    Am J Psychiatry 169:1185-93. 2012
  2. pmc Increased diffusivity in acute multiple sclerosis lesions predicts risk of black hole
    R T Naismith
    Neurology, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Neurology 74:1694-701. 2010
  3. pmc One-year change in anterior cingulate cortex white matter microstructure: relationship with late-life depression outcomes
    Warren D Taylor
    Departments of Psychiatry, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Am J Geriatr Psychiatry 19:43-52. 2011

Scientific Experts

  • Warren Taylor
  • R T Naismith
  • Yvette I Sheline
  • P Murali Doraiswamy
  • Kathleen A Welsh-Bohmer
  • Tommaso Toffanin
  • Carl Pieper
  • Brianne M Disabato
  • Consuelo Wilkins
  • Carrie Morris
  • Jennifer Hranilovich
  • Gina D'Angelo
  • David C Steffens
  • Ranga R Krishnan
  • Deanna M Barch
  • James R MacFall

Detail Information

Publications4

  1. pmc Treatment course with antidepressant therapy in late-life depression
    Yvette I Sheline
    Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA
    Am J Psychiatry 169:1185-93. 2012
    ....
  2. pmc Increased diffusivity in acute multiple sclerosis lesions predicts risk of black hole
    R T Naismith
    Neurology, Washington University, St Louis, MO 63110, USA
    Neurology 74:1694-701. 2010
    ..We hypothesize that DTI can quantify the damage within acute multiple sclerosis (MS) white matter lesions to predict gadolinium (Gd)-enhancing lesions that will persist 12 months later as T1 hypointensities...
  3. pmc One-year change in anterior cingulate cortex white matter microstructure: relationship with late-life depression outcomes
    Warren D Taylor
    Departments of Psychiatry, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA
    Am J Geriatr Psychiatry 19:43-52. 2011
    ..To better describe these relationships, the authors examined how 1-year change in DTI measures are related to 1-year course of depression...